30 March, 2012

Jacob Bongertman



Jacob Bongertman ( Leeuwarden 1879 - Haarlem, 1965) was a Dutch gym teacher , aswimming method developed in the 20s of the twentieth century .

Training

After an initial career as a professional soldier Bongertman was a 1909 gymnastics teacher in Haarlem. He specialized in the classroom zwemonderwijs soon.

Vision

At the time they learned to swim the 'rod', which was an individual instruction and therefore less suitable for school education. Bongertman came upon the idea of a cylindrical sleeve design, with an air content of 10 liters, with a strap on the back of the pupil was confirmed.

With the same propellant or a cork board or in the hands he could become a floating classroom children and give swimming lessons. The air content of the bus was sufficient for the loss of buoyancy, because the head is above water, to compensate.

Method

Before going into the water, was given to the students in a bank in a short lesson, get educated and have essentially the kick . Until then they learned to work the rod method in a three-contact movement: withdrawal - spread out - connect (1, 2, 3). Bongertman let the leg work to do in a two-socket movement: withdraw - folding (1, 2). The intention was to hit as a continuous movement. He called this the whip.

The method can be briefly summarized:
Understanding the impact exercise on the couch.
The natural stroke is a two-contact movement.
Water learn to drive the buses.
The battle then run with the help of flotation devices.
The student drives and feels that he moves forward (swim).
After the kick follows education with the leeway there.
The pupil mastered the breaststroke enough, it follows rugzwemmen the same principle.

KNZB

The method was then groundbreaking and is used for half a century and propagated by the KNZB . Bongertman was a member of their merit. His motto was' swimming float and move around without power. "

Sources and references:

M. Boon: "It zwemonderwijs', ed. Nijgh & Van Ditmar, The Hague, 9th Edition 1965
"Brief summary of the history of swimming ', see www.maastrichtsereddingsbrigade.nl

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